Registration Open for UNH Election Law Symposium - October 7 - Online & In-Person

0
343
Posted by Kyle C. Kopko, community karma 343

Dear Colleagues,

The University of New Hampshire Law Review will host a Symposium on "Contemporary Issues in Election Law" on October 7, from 9am to 5pm.  This will be a hybrid event (attendees may attend in person at the UNH campus in Concord or watch via Zoom).  Registration is free of charge.  To register for the Symposium, please visit:  https://unh.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_EeTiFY7LSYygwMvSOcGGzg  

Below is the agenda.  

 

UNH 2022 Symposium:

Contemporary Issues in Election Law

October 7, 2022

All presentations will take place in Room 282 of the University of New Hampshire Franklin Pierce School of Law

 

8:15AM           Registration / Check-In
Franklin Pierce Center for Intellectual Property, Lower Atrium (enter at the intersection of Washington Street and Rumford Street)
 
9:00AM           Welcome
 
9:15AM           New Hampshire Election Law, Part I:  The Secretary of State’s Office
The Honorable David Scanlan, New Hampshire Secretary of State
 
9:40AM           New Hampshire Election Law, Part II:  The Election Law Committee
The Honorable Barbara Griffin, Chair of the Election Law Committee, New Hampshire House of Representatives
 
10:05AM         Voting Rights in New Hampshire and Beyond:  Perspectives of Civic Organizations
 
Henry Klementowicz, Senior Staff Attorney, American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire
 
Elizabeth Tentarelli, President, League of Women Voters of New Hampshire
 
Todd Hendricks,* Research and Data Analyst, NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund


11:05AM         BREAK
 
11:15AM         A Conversation with Commissioner Ellen L. Weintraub
The Honorable Ellen L. Weintraub, Commissioner, Federal Election Commission
 
12:00PM         LUNCH
 
1:00PM           Post-Election Controversies
Joel K. Goldstein,* Vincent C. Immel Professor of Law Emeritus, St. Louis University.  Manuscript Presentation:  “The Ministerial Role of the President of the Senate in Counting Electoral Votes:  A Post-January 6 Perspective”
 
Derek Muller, Professor of Law & Bouma Fellow in Law, University of Iowa.  Manuscript Presentation:  “Mandamus and Election Subversion.”
 
2:00PM           Alternative Voting Methods
Edward Foley,* Ebersold Chair in Constitutional Law & Director, Election Law at Moritz, The Ohio State University.  Manuscript Presentation:  “Red, White, and Blue Voting: A Three-Party Round-Robin Electoral System.”
 
2:30PM           BREAK
 
2:45PM           Issues in Redistricting                                
Richard Ober,* Legal Analyst, Princeton Gerrymandering Project, Princeton University; Samuel Wang, Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Princeton Gerrymandering Project, Princeton University.  Manuscript Presentation:  “All Pain, No Gain: A Fifty-State Analysis of Implications of the Independent State Legislature Doctrine for Redistricting.”
 
Jonathan Cervas,* Post-Doctoral Fellow in Political Science, Carnegie Mellon University; Bernard Grofman, Jack W. Peltason Endowed Chair & Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of California, Irvine.  Manuscript Presentation:  “Can State Courts Constrain Partisan Gerrymandering? Lessons from the 2021 Redistricting Cycle.” 
 
3:45PM           The Security of Voting
Andrew W. Appel,* Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science, Princeton University.  Manuscript Presentation:  “Is Internet Voting Trustworthy?  The Science and the Policy Battles.” 
 
Eugene D.  Mazo,* Visiting Professor of Law, Seton Hall University.  Manuscript Presentation: “Ballot Harvesting.” 
 
4:45PM           Concluding Remarks
Bradford E. Cook, Senior Shareholder and Past President, Sheehan Phinney Bass + Green; Former Board of Trustees, UNH School of Law; Member, Advisory Board, Rudman Center; Chair, New Hampshire Ballot Law Commission; Co-Chair, N.H Secretary of State’s Special Committee on Voter Confidence
 
5:00PM – 6:15PM      Reception
                       
* Presenters who will publish a manuscript in the Symposium issue of The University of New Hampshire Law Review

almost 2 years ago